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Title: Naturally occurring cobalamin (B12) analogs can function as cofactors for human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase
Authors: Sokolovskaya, Olga M
Plessl, Tanja
Bailey, Henry
Keywords: Methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MMUT); Enzyme
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: Biochemical Journal
Abstract: Cobalamin, commonly known as vitamin B12, is an essential micronutrient for humans because of its role as an enzyme cofactor. Cobalamin is one of over a dozen structurally related compounds – cobamides – that are found in food and are produced by microorganisms in the human gut. Very little is known about how different cobamides affect B12-dependent metabolism in human cells. Here, we test in vitro how diverse cobamide cofactors affect the function of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MMUT), one of two cobalamin-dependent enzymes in humans. We find that, although cobalamin is the most effective cofactor for MMUT, multiple cobamides support MMUT function with differences in binding affinity (Kd), binding kinetics (kon), and concentration dependence during catalysis (KM, app). Additionally, we find that six disease-associated MMUT variants that cause cobalamin-responsive impairments in enzymatic activity also respond to other cobamides, with the extent of catalytic rescue dependent on the identity of the cobamide. Our studies challenge the exclusive focus on cobalamin in the context of human physiology, indicate that diverse cobamides can support the function of a human enzyme, and suggest future directions that will improve our understanding of the roles of different cobamides in human biology.
Description: Tài liệu này được phát hành theo giấy phép CC-BY-NC 4.0
URI: http://dlib.hust.edu.vn/handle/HUST/24346
Link item primary: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.03.20.997551v2
Appears in Collections:OER - Kỹ thuật hóa học; Công nghệ sinh học - Thực phẩm; Công nghệ môi trường
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